Sunday, July 04, 2004

Before we went crazy with layouts...

This is the broadsheet version of the Daily Telegraph, August 1, 1927. The look is very clean compared with post-World War II newspapers; there is a very clear headline style and even though heads bump everywhere, I had no trouble navigating:


Note: these are all bad photocopies; I'll replace them with better, readable versions when I get the CD copies from the library.

On August 27, 1927, the Daily Telegraph went tabloid and became the Daily Telegraph News Pictorial. Its front-page style showed inexperience in pictorial layout compared with the Illustrated Sydney News of 40 years earlier, but its inside pages are still quite clean.








Now look at some Aussie papers from the 1960s (not readable; scanned from a book, but click to view a larger version):




Here is what Harold Evans had to say about Aussie newspapers in the 1960s:

"The Australian preference for narrow columns and lots of them to a text-size page is seen at its extreme in the Brisbane evening which has eleven 9-pica columns separated by minimum white. This gives the Courier Mail's text a character count of around twcnty to a column. The Sydney Morning HeraId, the Melbourne Herald, and The Age, Melbourne, are ten columns to a page, but the new national The Australian has moved to eight and is all the more legible for that and The Age goes wider when it can. The excessively narrow columns, set in 8pt or 9pt, mean more eye-transfers per column for the reader. In turn they produce longer runs of grey text, which means more frequent paragraphing, or more cross-heads (in the Courier Mail the frequent large cross-heads have inadequate white). Mechanically, narrow columns are slower to set, and mean more hyphens and letterspacing.
The editorial argument for the narrowgauge setting is that it produces more news positions. This is certainly a good argument for a popular tabloid which, if it is to create a sense of busyness on its small sheet, is forced to narrow measure. But it is a doubtful argument for a broadsheet, and demands extreme care in the distribution of display type if the reader is to be able to see the messages for the mess.
The Courier Mail mixes Bodoni Black, Cooper Black, Franklin Gothic Bold, Cheltenham, and Placard, and though an attempt is made to keep heads away from each other the effect is still of being beaten by a blunt instrument. Two points are worth noting: the freedom the Courier Mail gains at the top of the page by a small title (the blackletter survives in many Australian papers), and the vigorous use of two wellplaced pictures.
The Australian, of which this is not a typical example, is notable for its attractive title, well spaced with the symbol at the left, and typographically for the Century and Century Bold Extended. (The lines in the second deck of the lead could, however, be pulled closer together.) Note also the striking cross-reference panel columns 2 3."
(Editing and Design: A five-volume manual of English, Typography and Layout; Book Five: Newspaper Design, Heinemann, 1973, p125)

I must say I disagree with his comment about the "two well-placed pictures" in the Courier Mail...

5 Comments:

At August 27, 2005 at 11:16 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey, those papers look just like the ones in Liberia. It's unbelieveable, but I guess we shuld just be satisfied there are papers after 15 years of war. I hear progress is on the way!

 
At August 27, 2005 at 11:17 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey, those papers look just like the ones in Liberia. It's unbelieveable, but I guess we should just be satisfied there are papers after 15 years of war. I hear progress is on the way!

 
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At August 19, 2007 at 5:11 PM, Anonymous Phentermine said...

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At September 11, 2007 at 9:59 AM, Anonymous Anonimous said...

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